Leading historian decries national flagellation

A leading Canadian historian decries the restoration of the recently reopened Bellevue House in Kingston, Ontario. Patrice Dutil, Canada’s foremost authority on Sir John A. Macdonald, writes in The Hub that the renovated historic site “provides yet another embarrassing display of national flagellation.” Dutil, a professor and senior fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute, will publish…

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Trump, Dementia, Collective Pathology

This is the most detailed and devastating critique of Trump I have seen in a while. It turned up on Quora, but since we can’t link to it, I’m quoting it here. By Mike Burch / Works at Alpha Omega Consulting Group (company) Will Trump last until the election? He seems to be deteriorating much faster than…

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Bourrie revisits New France in the 1600s

Saint or cultural assailant? Mark Bourrie takes a new look at a Jesuit martyr in Crosses in the Sky: Jean de Brebeuf and the Destruction of Huronia (Biblioasis, 448 pages, $26.95).  Review by Ken McGoogan /  Special to the Star In 2019, Mark Bourrie published Bush Runner, a biography of the adventurer Pierre-Esprit Radisson. In a…

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Visiting the Ancestors of Alice Munro

Alice Munro turned up in my 2013 book 50 Canadians Who Changed the World. Under the heading, “Booker Prize winner creates her own country,” I began  by quoting Jonathan Franzen and Cynthia Ozick and the judges who awarded Munro the Man Book International Prize. From there I waxed eloquent for 1,700 words. But the painting above,…

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What happens when autocrats gain control?

What happened last century when authoritarians gained control of leading democracies? History doesn’t repeat but, as the saying goes, sometimes it rhymes. Bestselling historian and author Ken McGoogan delves into dictatorships of the twentieth century to sound the alarm about the possibility of democratic collapse in the US and what that might mean for Canada.…

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Big Franklin longlisted for Dafoe Book Prize

Searching for Franklin has made the longlist for the J.W. Dafoe Book Prize. This is the 40th anniversary for the prize, which goes to “the best book on Canada, Canadians, and/or Canada’s place in the world published in the previous calendar year.” The Prize memorializes John Wesley Dafoe, one of the most significant Canadian editors…

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American adventurer hails Big Franklin Book

Searching for Franklin has just appeared in a new U.S. edition. Here is a review that turned up at Amazon.com. 5.0 out of 5 stars The latest and most up-to-date information on the Franklin mysteries. See here: Reviewed in the United States on April 15, 2024 / Verified Purchase Review by Jay W. Zvolanek First, a disclaimer:…

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Best books about what happened to Franklin

I did not set out to write six books about Arctic exploration. By the mid-1990s, while working full-time as a journalist, I had published three novels. I proposed to become a celebrated novelist. But then, during a three-month stint at the University of Cambridge, I discovered Arctic explorer John Rae–and that he had been denied…

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Early Inuit explorers of Great Britain

Part 3: Once More Into the Passage Early in the nineteenth century, as more and more British whalers and explorers turned up in the Arctic, at least two young Inuit found ways to reverse the usual direction of exploration. John Sakeouse and Eenoolooapik went from their Arctic homes to the UK and caused quite a…

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